kenobi-wan-obi:


Windmill Galaxy by Fred Espenak

The brightest part of the autumn Milky Way appears in the southwest during the early evening hours. It includes the brighter summer constellations of Scorpius, and Sagittarius. A lone windmill is silhouetted in the foreground.

kenobi-wan-obi:

Windmill Galaxy by Fred Espenak

The brightest part of the autumn Milky Way appears in the southwest during the early evening hours. It includes the brighter summer constellations of Scorpius, and Sagittarius. A lone windmill is silhouetted in the foreground.

(Source: afro-dominicano)

Look for Vernal our dunkel wheat wine. It is 12.5%ABV and brewed with local wheat and local grade ‘B’ maple syrup. (The super flavorful stuff!) It is super limited and always goes fast. You can call us up at the brewery if you are having a hard time finding this spring treat.
mothernaturenetwork:

Maple syrup: Why the real stuff makes all the differenceWhat to look for when shopping for maple syrup, and how to use it for the most delicious results.

Look for Vernal our dunkel wheat wine. It is 12.5%ABV and brewed with local wheat and local grade ‘B’ maple syrup. (The super flavorful stuff!) It is super limited and always goes fast. You can call us up at the brewery if you are having a hard time finding this spring treat.

mothernaturenetwork:

Maple syrup: Why the real stuff makes all the difference
What to look for when shopping for maple syrup, and how to use it for the most delicious results.

Lucia here, inviting you to join us for a special beer launch at the Clover HUB. We’ve been obsessed with Element Brewing since before we had restaurants (see Ayr’s early posts on Element on the Clover blog). Element makes beers that fuse different styles together, or create entirely new styles altogether!

Element is pretty elusive in the Boston area, but last year we were able to get our hands on a few kegs of Element’s Red Giant, and ever since we’ve been dying to see what Ben and Dan will come up with next…

Next Thursday, ELEMENT PLASMA hits Clover!

Thursday 3/13 at 8pm, brewer Ben Arhant will be in the house at CloverHUB with a keg of ELEMENT PLASMA, an IPA brewed with sake yeast, malted buckwheat, malted millet, brown rice, and Aramis hops. It’s a cross between a sake and an IPA, and it happens to be totally gluten-free!

Pre-register to attend a private talk with the brewer before the launch starts!

The first ten people to pre-register will get to attend a private talk with the brewer with snacks from Clover. (Over 21 only, must show ID in person, talk starts at 8pm, general admission after that.)

We’re excited. Bring your friends and join us:

ELEMENT PLASMA BEER LAUNCH
Thursday, 3/13 at CloverHUB, 1075 Cambridge St.
8pm for pre-registered folks, 8:15 for general public
$5 beers, full Clover menu

(If you’re dying to try Element pre-launch, you can usually find a bottle or two at Central Bottle or Formaggio Kitchen or a few specialty beer shops)


Clover Food Lab
1075 Cambridge Street,
Cambridge, MA

NYC Craft Beer Festival Spring Seasonal Favorites | NiteTables

Science of Beer

Scientific explanation of beer-tapping physicsimage_2Ah, the old beer-tapping prank: One strong hit on the top of an open beer bottle, and poof! Your IPA explodes into a brewski volcano. 

"In one second, most of your beer has really turned into foam," says Javier Rodriguez Rodriguez, assistant professor at the Fluid Mechanics Group of Carlos III University in Madrid. "You better have put the bottle into your mouth, because you need to drink whatever is coming out." 

Physicists know quite a bit about beer foam, Rodriguez says. They’ve pinpointed the components of barley and wheat that make a fluffy, thick head. And they’ve explained why the bubbles in Guinness sink instead of rise. 

But the tapping phenomenon has been a long-standing puzzle in beer science ? until now. 

Rodriguez and his team have figured out that a stiff hit on the bottle’s top sets off miniature explosions inside the beer. These tiny blasts create mushroom clouds similar to those generated in the air by an atomic bomb, the Salt reported. 

"Actually, the laws of physics that control the development of these beer mushroom clouds are the same as [those that drive] the development of the cloud in an atomic bomb," Rodriguez says. "Obviously, there’s no nuclear stuff in the beer. So the source of the explosion is very different, but the mushroom cloud that you see is very similar." 

Rodriguez presented his findings at the end of November at a scientific meeting in Pittsburgh. But the idea for the project started where all good beer research does - at a pub. 

He and a bunch of scientists went to a bar one night after work, when one of their friends fell victim to beer tapping. “We asked ourselves, what was the cause for this?” Rodriguez says. “So we decided to go to the lab and do some experiments under well-controlled conditions.” 

They started filming the process in the lab with high-speed cameras. And eventually, the team realized that bottle tapping set off a chain reaction in the beer ? a bit like a Rube Goldberg device. The end result was a mushroom cloud of beer. But the steps in between are a bit more complicated. 

Step 1: Throbbing bubbles 

A swift strike on the bottle’s mouth sends waves down through the liquid. The waves cause tiny bubbles in the beer to pulsate. They shrink and swell. 

The glass bottle may seem solid, but it can act like a spring, Rodriguez says. “So when you hit the spring, [the glass] compresses and creates waves. From a mathematical point of view, it’s like a sound wave traveling through in the beer.” 

Step 2: The collapse 

At some point, the bubbles just can’t take the compression anymore. The force becomes too much for the gaseous pockets, and they shatter - very quickly. 

"The bubbles collapse violently," Rodriguez explains. "They break up into clouds of tiny fragments - and in very little time." (Physicists call this process cavitation.) 

Step 3: The rise 

Here’s where the magic starts happening. 

The tiny fragments of bubbles start to grow very rapidly. “The carbon dioxide has an easier time to get into the bubbles because of the increase in surface area,” Rodriguez says. “So they grow very, very fast.” 

As they grow, they become lighter and lighter. So they start to rise. “It’s like a spot of hot air in the environment,” he says. “The bubbles are buoyant and will rise.” 

Step 4: The eruption 

Now the reaction has reached the point of no return. “The faster the bubbles rise, the faster they grow, because the mixing with carbon dioxide is more efficient,” Rodriguez says. 

And that creates a self-feeding loop: The bubbles keep growing and rising, faster and faster. Ultimately, the loop becomes so intense that plumes or mushroom clouds of bubbles form in the beer. 

The result is foam spewing out of the beer bottle in a few hundred milliseconds, Rodriguez says. “There’s really not much you can do to stop it.” 

All right, so the end result of all this research is that, sadly, you can’t save your beer from the evils of tapping. But Rodriguez and his colleagues are now studying whether their findings may have applications beyond the bar. 

For example, there have been instances when large amounts of carbon dioxide have suddenly erupted from lakes and volcanoes. “Some geologists think that our findings could have technological applications to prevent these incidents - or even [for] carbon dioxide sequestration,” he says. 

Who knows? Maybe the science of beer tapping could one day prove useful in the fight against climate change.

Hope this gets your blood flowing. Happy St. Valentine’s day!
freshphotons:

InViVo Medical Animation of Red Blood Cells.

Hope this gets your blood flowing. Happy St. Valentine’s day!

freshphotons:

InViVo Medical Animation of Red Blood Cells.

(Source: freshphotons)

Plasma IPA

Plasma – A Drink for a Gluten-free Diet

Not the ionized gas type of plasma; if you were drinking that type of plasma then a gluten intolerance would be the last of your worries. Plasma Sake IPA is a gluten-free beer brewed by the Element Brewing Company in Millers Falls from brown rice, malted millet and buckwheat and aramis hops. By taking the wheat and barley out of the beer, the company has also taken out the gluten, meaning this is one of the only beers around that people with Celiac Disease, gluten-intolerant people and anyone looking to cut down on gluten in their diet can drink without risk to their health.

Brewed properly, beer is generally a healthy drink (drinking responsibly is important - to find out if you are drinking healthily you should take this alcohol addiction quiz), containing nothing more than water, yeast, barley, wheat and hops. It was what people used to drink daily in the days when the water could kill you. But for anyone who has a reaction to gluten, beer has always been a no-no. The wheat and barley contain more gluten than anyone with Celiac Disease or an intolerance could handle, leading to stomach cramps, skin problems and even anemia. This is the last thing breweries want beer drinkers to be going through. They want them to enjoy their beer as much as possible and, if anything, for it to beneficial to their health, full of goodness and nutrients, rather than harmful. Celiac Disease and gluten intolerance are on the rise, meaning fewer people can really enjoy beer without bad side-effects. The Element Brewing Company have worked hard to find alternative starch sources for their little yeast friends to dine on so that everyone can enjoy a delicious beer, be it on a hot summer’s day or a cold winter’s evening.

Rice Beer?

A few of you have probably partaken a little sake on a visit to the local sushi restaurant. Most people think of it as ‘rice wine’ or even a liquor, so you’d be forgiven for wondering what the hell it is doing near a beer. However, the actual method for producing sake is much more closely related to the fermentation of beer than it is the fermentation of wine or the distillation of whisky. Sake uses rice during the fermentation process and Element have borrowed this method to remove the gluten present in barley from the beer ingredients. They have chosen only the best, most healthy brown rice for their Plasma beer in order to preserve all the great nutrients found in brown rice, such as B vitamins and iron. The brown rice also adds a rich, nutty flavor to the final product, complimenting the hops and giving Plasma a unique flavor that you will not taste in any regular wheat and barley beer.

Malted buckwheat

It may have ‘wheat’ in its name but buckwheat is no relation to the wheat you might get in your cereal bowl or find in other beers. More closely related to herbs such as sorrel or rhubarb the wheat name only comes from it uses as a wheat substitute rather than being a cousin of the plant. Another source of vitamins and minerals in the Plasma beer, buckwheat is rich in iron, zinc and antioxidants and has been used in food and drinks in the east for centuries. A distinctive smell and taste, it adds again to the complex aroma of this Indian Pale Ale.

A new type of hop

Aramis hops are a new variety of hops from Alsace in eastern France. A child of the Strisselspalt hop it has an herbal aroma, with hints of lemon and bergamot. Its high alpha acid rating allows Element to use aggressive hopping to bring out more flavor in the beer and combine the correct beer bitterness with the sweet floral aroma of the herbs and fruit.

All this combines to produce a beer that is gluten-free and good for everybody, without compromising on taste or quality. In fact, it is so good that even if you don’t have a problem with gluten you should consider a pint. Its unique aroma, strong taste and different ingredients make it an attractive option for any beer connoisseur looking for something distinctive and unafraid of something new. Element’s Plasma Sake IPA combines the best ingredients, the best brewing and the best quality into a beer that everyone can enjoy.

Tickets on sale now for the dim sum dinner! There are only 40 so get them while they last.

Tickets on sale now for the dim sum dinner! There are only 40 so get them while they last.

Element’s custom made “Brewbik’s Cube™” is now for sale on our web store and soon to be available at the brewery!

Element’s custom made “Brewbik’s Cube™” is now for sale on our web store and soon to be available at the brewery!

kenobi-wan-obi:


The Sun - Composite Image

The below image was composed from 3 images listed below:
Credits for SWAP image - Dan Seaton, Royal Observatory of Belgium
Credits for eclipse image - the Williams College Eclipse Expedition, by Allen Davis and Jay Pasachoff
Credits for LASCO image - NRL and LASCO Team/SOHO/ESA & NASA.

kenobi-wan-obi:

The Sun - Composite Image

The below image was composed from 3 images listed below:

Credits for SWAP image - Dan Seaton, Royal Observatory of Belgium

Credits for eclipse image - the Williams College Eclipse Expedition, by Allen Davis and Jay Pasachoff

Credits for LASCO image - NRL and LASCO Team/SOHO/ESA & NASA.

(Source: afro-dominicano)